Aikido

A few words about AIKIDO

Aiki­do is a japa­ne­se mar­tial art and a way of human deve­lo­p­ment, as the last sylla­ble of its name sug­gests: “do” is usu­ally transla­ted from Japa­ne­se as “way”. It was foun­ded in the first half of the 20th cen­tu­ry by Mori­hei Ueshi­ba (1883–1969) as a result of his long stu­dy of old mar­tial arts and spi­ri­tu­al tea­chings.

The­re are seve­ral aspects in aiki­do:

phy­s­i­cal exer­ci­se and heal­th,
per­so­nal deve­lo­p­ment and
self-defen­ce.

In such a wide ran­ge of possi­bi­li­ties any inte­res­ted stu­dent can find inspi­rati­on for his/her life jour­ney.
The following paragra­phs detail some aspects of aiki­do, but no words can sub­sti­tu­te the beau­ti­ful expe­ri­en­ce of aiki­do practi­ce.
If you would like to expe­ri­en­ce it for your­self, feel free to join our tra­i­ning.

Physical practice

The base for any deve­lo­p­ment in aiki­do is phy­s­i­cal practi­ce. On this level aiki­do con­sists of vari­ous throws and pin­ning tech­niques and inclu­des practi­ce with wea­pons: woo­den sword, sta­ff and kni­fe. Aiki­do does not focus on blocks, kicks or pun­ches when dea­ling with an oppo­nent. Inste­ad it uses the ener­gy flow of a given attack to dis­sol­ve it.

A rela­xed dyna­mic practi­ce of cir­cu­lar aiki­do tech­niques impro­ves body coor­di­nati­on, fle­xi­bi­li­ty, sta­mi­na and stren­gth and deve­lops also body postu­re and natu­ral bre­athing.

Such tra­i­ning sup­ports the flow of ener­gy from the cen­ter to the who­le body. Thus aiki­do does not only impro­ve muscles, but has a much dee­per effect on human heal­th.

Personal development and mental attitude

Bet­ter body con­di­ti­on and natu­ral postu­re are not the only things that one can bring from aiki­do tra­i­ning to one’s life. Good phy­s­i­cal pose and postu­re reflects men­tal atti­tu­de in the same way that aiki­do prin­ci­ples can be reflec­ted in our day-to-day lives. Such prin­ci­ples can be; inner balan­ce, the abi­li­ty to find one’s pla­ce in a spa­ce, expres­sing inten­ti­on and per­cep­ti­on of the body.

When we practi­ce tech­niques in pairs, we practi­ce com­mu­ni­cati­on with others. More­o­ver, a tra­i­ning part­ner is our mirror, which gives us an oppor­tu­ni­ty to see our limits and over­co­me them – aiki­do is sure­ly a tool for self-deve­lo­p­ment.

Personal development and mental attitude

Bet­ter body con­di­ti­on and natu­ral postu­re are not the only things that one can bring from aiki­do tra­i­ning to one’s life. Good phy­s­i­cal pose and postu­re reflects men­tal atti­tu­de in the same way that aiki­do prin­ci­ples can be reflec­ted in our day-to-day lives. Such prin­ci­ples can be; inner balan­ce, the abi­li­ty to find one’s pla­ce in a spa­ce, expres­sing inten­ti­on and per­cep­ti­on of the body.

When we practi­ce tech­niques in pairs, we practi­ce com­mu­ni­cati­on with others. More­o­ver, a tra­i­ning part­ner is our mirror, which gives us an oppor­tu­ni­ty to see our limits and over­co­me them – aiki­do is sure­ly a tool for self-deve­lo­p­ment.

Conflict and harmony

The foun­der of aiki­do emphasi­zed the moral and spi­ri­tu­al points of aiki­do, espe­ci­ally deve­lo­p­ment of har­mo­ny and pea­ce – the word aiki­do is some­ti­mes loo­se­ly transla­ted as “the way of har­mo­ny“. This har­mo­ny can be under­s­to­od as a uni­ty with one­self, others, the envi­ron­ment or sim­ply with the who­le Uni­ver­se.
Even thou­gh the idea of pea­ce in a fighting art can appear para­do­xi­cal, it is the basis for both tech­niques and men­tal atti­tu­de in aiki­do.

However, the words har­mo­ny and pea­ce in aiki­do do not mean retre­at and com­pro­mi­se mas­king a fear of con­flict. Aiki­do tea­ches us to sol­ve con­flicts in our lives in a con­structi­ve way, without vio­len­ce, and the­re­fo­re edu­ca­tes strong and deter­mi­ned peo­ple.

Self-defence

Aiki­do usu­ally does not attract peo­ple who like vio­len­ce or fighting. The tra­i­ning is based on mar­tial arts tech­niques, which of cour­se hel­ps to deve­lop one’s abi­li­ty to respond correct­ly and effecti­ve­ly in cases of phy­s­i­cal con­flict.
Self-defen­ce is not the goal of aiki­do practi­ce but it is a natu­ral and direct con­sequen­ce.

Self-defence

Aiki­do usu­ally does not attract peo­ple who like vio­len­ce or fighting. The tra­i­ning is based on mar­tial arts tech­niques, which of cour­se hel­ps to deve­lop one’s abi­li­ty to respond correct­ly and effecti­ve­ly in cases of phy­s­i­cal con­flict.
Self-defen­ce is not the goal of aiki­do practi­ce but it is a natu­ral and direct con­sequen­ce.

I want to get news from
AIKIDO PRAHA VINOHRADY